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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  August 23, 2018 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at five — the government sets out its advice for people and businesses about how to manage, if the uk leaves the eu without a deal. government papers warn of the impact on businesses, nhs patients, farmers and uk expats — but the brexit secretary insists a no—deal scenarios remains unlikely. it is not what we want and it is not what we expect. but we must be ready. we have a duty as a responsible government to plan for every eventuality. the guidance includes instructions for businesses who could face extra paperwork at borders — and contingency plans to avoid medicine shortages. we'll be looking at the detail — and speaking to business about a possible no—deal. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: the british—iranian woman nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is reunited with her daughter — after being granted three days temporary release from prison in iran. a slight rise in the overall pass rate, as pupils across england,
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wales and northern ireland get their gcse results. president trump warns that any attempt to impeach him would have severe consequences for the us economy. and we talk to the teenage son of michael schumacher — who wants to follow in his father's formula one footsteps. our main story at five: advice has been published for businesses and individuals about how to prepare for any impact — if the uk leaves the european union next year without a deal on the future relationship. the government has released the first in a series of documents which cover areas including trade, medical supplies, farming
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and financial services. the brexit secretary dominic raab says he's confident of avoiding a no—deal scenario. here are some of the key elements within the 25 documents. free circulation of goods between the uk and eu would cease — and companies trading with europe would face increased costs and new paperwork to cover customs and safety declarations. the cost of card payments between the uk and eu will probably increase, and won't be covered by the ban on surcharges. the uk would continue to accept medicines that have been tested in the eu to ensure a smooth supply. but the pharmaceutical industry should ensure they have an additional six week supply of drugs in the event of disruption caused by a no—deal brexit. britons living elsewhere in europe could lose access to uk banking and pension services
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without eu action. farmers will continue to receive eu subsidies — but organic farmers could lose the abilitity to export their goods to the eu unless they get certification, which could take nine months. our political correspondent iain watson has the details. deal or no deal? brexit will affect every aspect of british life. today, the government released 25 papers on a wide range of issues examining what could happen if they fall out of the eu without a deal. amongst the questions that the government is trying to answer was what would happen to medical supplies, to nuclear research, to payments for farmers and to our major money earner — the financial services industry. but first and foremost, the brexit secretary wants to accentuate the positives. good morning, everyone. he said he expected to strike a strong deal with the eu but... naturally, we have got
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to consider the alternative possibility that the eu doesn't match our ambition and pragmatism, that we do not reach a deal. but let me be clear about this, it is not what we want and it is not what we expect. but we must be ready. we have a duty as a responsible government to plan for every eventuality. the paper set out some of the specific action the government would take in the event of a no deal. to keep the health service supplied, the uk would continue to recognise eu medical devices. the government would guarantee payments to farmers that currently come from brussels. and to limit financial disruption, eu banking and insurance companies could get temporary permission to operate in the uk. and the brexit secretary said this about life outside the eu, listen closely... in some cases, it will mean taking unilateral action to maintain as much continuity as possible, at least in the short—term, in the event of no deal. and irrespective of whether the eu reciprocates in practice. translated, unilateral action means voluntarily following eu rules and standards for a period
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after brexit to help trade flow as freely as possible. some leave campaigners might not be too keen on that. and the government's no deal papers also acknowledge that could be some negative consequences. for example, for consumers, the paper said that the cost of card payments will likely increase. import and export declarations for goods will be needed, increasing business bureaucracy. and there is no guarantee that uk citizens living in the eu will get the same access to financial services, possibly including their pensions. this is not project here by critics of brexit, this is the government itself and independent bodies pointing to the damage that will be caused. there is a suggestion
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businesses face a bureaucratic nightmare. but dominic raab has been insisting there are some benefits to leaving the eu without an agreement, not least that our payments to brussels would end more swiftly. labour claimed the government is in a panic, and some seniorfigures would not rule out a second referendum. we are calling for it in the event article 50 is voted down, we think all options should be on the table. that is the labour party party position. for the immediate purpose of today's documents, to reassure businesses there is nothing to fear if we leave the eu with or without a deal. in a moment we'll be speaking to our correspondent damian grammaticus in brussels, but first our political correspondent susana mendonca is in westminster. dominic raab saying over and over
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again, not thinking that a new deal scenario is likely but nonetheless there is some sobering reading the government has produced today —— no deal. the government wants to give across this message of reassurance, they think they can get a deal. in they think they can get a deal. in the unlikely event that they could get a no deal, they have these plans in place. this is the first tranche of these documents, we will be getting 70 such documents in the next few weeks. 148 pages, a bit frayed because we'd been looking through all that detail. a lot in there about medicine, farming, finance, concerns as you heard from the report. farmers are concerned, issues around whether or not people who produce organic goods will be able to export them across the border and potentially that they might have to go through nine months
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of certifications. that's one concerned. if you are a british person living in the eu, you potentially might not get access to your pension. i was talking to the treasury about this a short while ago, they told me it's all about where the company is based. if your pension company is in the eu, that potentially certainly from britain's point of view, it would allow you to get that pension if you are here but if you are in the... a british person in the eu, the eu might not doa person in the eu, the eu might not do a reciprocal deals and that's one of the key problems there. also medicines. earlier in the week we had concerns about whether or not there would be shortages. this document says the government is going to get pharmaceutical companies to stockpile and what have you but the reality is there could be shortages. lots of concern certainly from people about some of the stuff in here but the government basically saying this is all about planning in case we end up with a no deal scenario. they certainly feel confident there will be a deal.
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labour thinks they are not taking the reality, the prospect of a no deal seriously enough. they think all options should be on the table, come the autumn when parliament is looking at this issue and whether or not it's going to 0k looking at this issue and whether or not it's going to ok the deal that theresa may comes backwards. if they do not ok that, actually the idea of a second referendum which is not labour's policy but the idea should not be off the table. thank you. 0ur europe correspondent damian grammaticas is in brussels. what is being said where you are this afternoon about these documents from the british government? they have been pretty tight—lipped here, but what they have said is that they have been preparing for the impacts of brexit for over one year, issuing their own notices here. today they said they had been making the point the eu side that deal or no deal, there will be significant impacts and significant disruption. these impacts that you see in these uk
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notices so they are if you like the base case. they say this is automatic operation of moving outside eu law and eu structures. those will have to be faced up to. they say the best way to do that, to mitigate that is to agree a withdrawal deal because that ties up all these things, it gives the uk and other two years of certainty and that's the best approach. —— another two years. on the uk side, things like medicine that they would wade through, approve medicines already approved in the eu side, but they can't miss the same back here. the eu insists it will treat treat the uk as eu insists it will treat treat the ukasa eu insists it will treat treat the uk as a third country and that means applying all its rules and regulations and if uk medical regulators are not in the eu after exit, then they went to be counted and they won't be seen here special arrangements. —— they won't be
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counted. all on this relies in many ways on the eu to reciprocate. thank you. 0ur economics correspondent andy verityjoins me now. financial services so incredibly important is all this, what have you been picking up on reading through all the documents in front of you about what is said there? the most serious one is one we discussed recently to do with pensions. this may seem like a remote risk and you can get around there but there is a risk that people are not able to ta ke risk that people are not able to take their pensions. if they are british pensioners living in the rest of the eu, the problem is if at the moment you are an insurer in the uk you are automatically licensed in the rest of europe so it's no problem to pay pensions to someone living in spain or germany or italy. however if we exit without a deal, oui’ however if we exit without a deal, our insurers hirwaun to be recognised as insurers in spain or
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germany, they won't be approved. —— oui’ germany, they won't be approved. —— our insurers here won't be recognised. they are in a predicament where either they do something illegal or breach the contract, both unpalatable. you can get round it by setting up a subsidiary that you would have to do that in each country in which you pay payment. you would be subject to the individual member states saying it's ok to carry on. what's been said by dominic raab and others is we hope the eu will take a practical sta nce we hope the eu will take a practical stance on this and that's fair enough but it does depend on goodwill. if there is not enough goodwill. if there is not enough goodwill to reach a deal, you wonder whether there will be these other things. a quick thoughts about credit cards? potentially also bank accou nts credit cards? potentially also bank accounts may be problematic. credit cards at the moment, what the eu did for us was get rid of the search arches that you sometimes would be hit by. -- arches that you sometimes would be hit by. —— surcharges you would sometimes be hit by. we also would
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not participate in the common payment systems which means when you withdraw cash abroad or make a payment to a abroad, it takes longer and possibly also costs more. thank you for now, andy verity. and we will have more on how a potential ‘no—deal‘ could affect british business, when we speak to two leading figures at 5.30. a british—iranian woman who's spent more than two years in prison in iran, has been given temporary release from jailfor three days. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was convicted of plotting to overthrow the regime in tehran — a charge she denied. her husband, richard ratcliffe, said in a statement her release was a "very happy surprise" and thanked the foreign secretary for his recent efforts.
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i spoke to her yesterday. quite cautious, quite down, stuck in prison and again, feeling just how time has stretched on. this morning, full of life and giggles and laughter and exuberant. i spoke to her as she came out of the, when she was sitting in the car. and i spoke to her after she saw gabriella. she wa nted to her after she saw gabriella. she wanted a bunch of flowers to give her money because she saw the other people when released from prison, they gave their family a bunch of flowers. she wanted to show mummy her toys and play, and mezzanine just wants to be with her, feeding her, help with the bath and all the things you do with children. joining us to give us some more details of this case is our correspondent richard galpin. as it stands is stilljust for three days, is that the case? as far as we
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understand but we do know her lawyer attempting to get it extended and there is president for doing this, there is president for doing this, there is president for doing this, there is what is called furlough where you are allowed out for sundays and you can get that extended. that is the hope, her lawyers working hard to get that done before she has to go back back on sunday. —— you are allowed out for summer days. we'll we get any formal explanation for the rationale formal explanation for the rationale for this? nothing so far, nothing at all from the iranian authorities and nothing from the foreign office here. one possible theory is the fa ct here. one possible theory is the fact that it is eat at the moment, and important islamic festival. in different parts of the muslim world, you do get prisoners being pardoned during these festivals. it could be about that, another theory that things have changed with the new foreign secretary jeremy things have changed with the new foreign secretaryjeremy hunt, maybe the diplomatic dynamic has changed.
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there have been some positive things. with the iranian embassy here now able to open its own bank account which had been blocked previously, that's happened recently so previously, that's happened recently so may positive things have happened which have helped make this whole thing happen but obviously for her and her family, the thing happen but obviously for her and herfamily, the key thing is that this is made permanent, it's not just a matter of that this is made permanent, it's notjust a matter of days out of prison. we simply wait to hear whether there could be any prospect of this becoming an even happier story in the coming days and weeks? yeah. we are waiting for that, waiting for the lawyer to get this extended. the headlines on bbc news... the government sets out its advice for people and businesses on how to manage if the uk leaves the eu without a deal. the british—iranian woman nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is granted three days temporary release from prison in iran. a slight rise in the overall pass rate, as pupils across england, wales and northern ireland
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get their gcse results. in sports, trainer markjohnston has broken the record for british winners, poets society britain by frankie dettori first past the post today for his 4194th winner. james vince recalled for the fourth test against india next week at southampton, dropped after a poor winter with england but the hampshire captain has been in good form for his county. gloucester fly— half form for his county. gloucester fly—half danny cipriani has been givenjust a fly—half danny cipriani has been given just a reprimand fly—half danny cipriani has been givenjust a reprimand by fly—half danny cipriani has been given just a reprimand by the fly—half danny cipriani has been givenjust a reprimand by the rfu after he was fined by a jersey magistrate last week for common assault and resisting arrest following a nightclub incident. i will be back with more after 5:30pm. hundreds of thousands of teenagers across england, wales and northern ireland have received their gcse results this morning. there's been a rise in the overall proportion of pupils
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attaining the pass mark — up by 0.5%. in england, there have been major changes to the exam, with a new grading system and less coursework. elaine dunkley has the details. oh, my god! the reactions are familiar... wha... what... ! but the way results are measured in england is different. for gcse students, it's out with a* to g and in with a new scale from 9 to 1, with 9 being the highest. i got a 8 in music, i got a 9 in geography, i got a 7 in history, i got a 9 in biology — happy with that as well, very happy. i got three 95... one, two, three, four, five... five 85... no, seven 85 and one 7. and it's notjust the grades that have changed — there's less coursework and more emphasis on final exams to make gcses more challenging. near enough every subject said that they overtaught us because they didn't know what to expect, and i think
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personally with the amount of content we had to do, to give us the same period of time to do the test, it was a lot to handle. a lot of people are just used to the grade system, where you get a letter? it's true, i don't actually tell them the numbers, i tell them in letters and there's a conversion chart on the bbc website so i sent that to them as well — if they want to know the numbers. but they know that there's a new grading system. the overall pass rate in england, wales and northern ireland has gone up 0.5 percentage points to 66.9%. 90% of the gcse entries in england were the new exams. only 4% got the new top grade of 9. exam regulators say pupils haven't been penalised because of the changes and grade boundaries have been moved so the same proportion of pupils get good grades as in previous years. at this school, the principal is not convinced. it's madness, really. maybe there was a need to make the exams more difficult, and i don't think the profession would argue against that. but it's as if nobody knows when to stop. so now, we've got the boundary
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changes and now they're trying to equal it as the same proportion getting an a to c — what was the point of changing it, then? there has been a drop in the a* to c pass rate in wales, and improvement for those in northern ireland. meanwhile in england, the government says the new 9 to 1 grades are a better way to differentiate between the abilities of students. what we've introduced are far more demanding, more rigorous gcses that are a better preparation for a—level and a better preparation for apprenticeships and vocational qualifications and a better preparation for a life in modern britain. you did so well! the reforms have been wide—ranging, but there has been criticism that the changes have been far too steep a learning curve for schools in england. elaine dunkley, bbc news. there's more information about gcse results on the news web page — with links to ‘bitesize' where there's advice for both parents and pupils. 12 people have been arrested
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and charged in connection with allegations of child abuse at a home run by an order of nuns in south lanarkshire. smyllum park closed in the 1980s. 0ur scotland correspondent james shaw is in glasgow. what more details are emerging? we know 12 of those people, of those 12, 11 women, one man. there are a number of nuns in that 12. they have not said how many the age range, well, quite old, generally speaking, ranging from 60 to 85. that possibly reflects the fact that smyllum park did close in 1981. it had run for
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100 years, run by this catholic order of nuns, the daughters of charity of st vincent, but it closed in 81. also interesting, it has been the subject, what happened at the home, has been the subject of evidence sessions at the scottish child abuse enquiry which has been building an earlier this year. it's possible there may be a connection between that of use and the police enquiries which have been going on. we also know that four other people have reported to the procurator fiscal, the public prosecutor in scotland, and that office will make a decision as to whether those people as well might also be arrested and charged. commenting on this case, the head of the scotland's child abuse investigation unit, detective chief inspector server unit, detective chief inspector server taylor, said it was always the case that they put the interests
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of the victims and alleged victims at the centre of their investigations. i should also say with reference to the child abuse enquiry, the daughters of charity, in terms of reference to the evidence heard there, offered what they described as their sincere and heartfelt apologies for anyone who had suffered during the time they we re had suffered during the time they were in their care. president trump has warned that any attempt to impeach him would have severe consequences for the us economy. in an interview with fox news, mr trump warned of an economic crash were he to be removed from office. he also discussed his relationship with former campaign manager paul manafort and lawyer michael cohen, who told a court earlier this week that he had broken us electoral laws on the orders of mrtrump. i didn't know manafort well, he wasn't with the campaign long. they got him on things totally unrelated to the campaign.
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and by the way, they got cohen on totally unrelated to the campaign. i'm not involved, i wasn't charged with anything. people don't like to say that, but i wasn't charged. i don't know how you can impeach somebody who's done a greatjob? i'll tell you what, if i ever got impeached, i think the market would crash. i think everybody would be poor because without this thinking, you would see numbers that you wouldn't believe — in reverse. that is just a section of that interview on fox news today. bruce fein is in washington, he is a lawyer who was associate deputy attorney general under president reagan. a good evening to you. what went through your mind about the events of the last 48 hours when you watch that interview just that with
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president trump? i still think he is living in a delusion. his mental universe does not correspond to reality. number one, an economic depression is not a defence to committing impeachable offences or crimes. secondly, his statement that the payoffs that michael cohen made to these two women for ten—year—old affairs in the middle of the presidential campaign had nothing to do with the campaign. it had everything to do with the campaign andindeed everything to do with the campaign and indeed mr cohen said the sole purpose of the payoff was to influence the outcome which was thought to be injeopardy if influence the outcome which was thought to be in jeopardy if these rather tawdry affairs were disclosed and could lose the religious might vote to mrjohn. i think mr trump's state m e nts vote to mrjohn. i think mr trump's statements their show he is in desperation. —— the religious right vote to mr trump.
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hit this wrongdoing grows more and more clear every day. this is michael cohen, his personal attorney you are talking about who pled guilty earlier in the week to a number of financial charges. your point that those payments to women we re point that those payments to women were specifically about the campaign, that's a crucial point. to explain to a british audience, that goes to the heart, am i right in saying, as to whether there is anything there that is impeachable? that's correct. the law is, the expenditure has to b to influence the outcome of a campaign. if this was not intended to influence the outcome of a campaign, why was ten yea rs outcome of a campaign, why was ten years permitted to lapse? these affairs with these two women were 2006, early 2007. why nothing happens for ten years and only when mrtrump isa happens for ten years and only when mr trump is a candidate and the election is approaching, suddenly 200 is paid for silence. —— suddenly
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£280,000 is paid, the purpose of this was to influence the election and that makes this a crime, not least an impeachable offence. he is violating the laws. so, all of that said, and with your experience, what is your bestjudgment about said, and with your experience, what is your best judgment about whether actually, we are any closer to impeachment? is that at this stage a realistic prospect? yes, i think we are about ten minutes to doomsday clock to midnight on the end of president trump's presidency. i think the two elements that most imponderable one, we will need televised hearings in order to bring the american people along to support impeachment that would provoke congress to act. for impeachment, you need the house of representatives to vote by a majority, articles of impeachment need two thirds of the senate to
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vote to convict after trial. we have political animals in congress and they will respond to public opinion which will be swayed not by documents known only to lawyers or people in the legal field, it's got to be information that in television. that means michael cohen will be critical. will he be like john dean in watergate, coming forth very polished and calm, acknowledging contrition, understanding his wrongdoing and being persuasive? 0r understanding his wrongdoing and being persuasive? or will he look like maybe he is a thug who came out of the godfather? and not be the kind of person the american people will be comfortable in reversing the outcome of the 2016 election. that's what we're looking at. the other element that comes into play here is because the vice president, mike pence, even if there were a conviction and mr trump is removed, it doesn't mean we're going to have really much if any change in policy. mr pentz is virtually a carbon copy of mrtrump in mr pentz is virtually a carbon copy of mr trump in all relevant areas
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except maybe even a little more forceful in freedom of religion. it's not like as dramatic a change as would be the case if you did not have a vice president and possibly the executive branch would fall into the executive branch would fall into the hands of the democrats. the third item that's another imponderable here is because of mr cohen's testimony, including not only the payoffs but that mr trump knew about eight 2016 june only the payoffs but that mr trump knew about eight 2016june meeting between his son, paul manafort and jared kushner with russians for the purpose of receiving dirt on hillary clinton, that would be a crime, too. soliciting something of value from a foreign government. that could lead toa foreign government. that could lead to a subpoena of mr trump, a supreme court decision ordering him to testify, a defiance of the subpoena and the court order, which again will push this into impeachment range. that would take probably six months. there was so much in there thatis months. there was so much in there that is fascinating. quickly i wa nted that is fascinating. quickly i wanted to ask, you mention public
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opinion, for all the extraordinary events we have seen opinion, for all the extraordinary events we have seen over opinion, for all the extraordinary events we have seen over the course of this presidency, donald trump's base remained solid. this does not appear to be affecting his core supporters? i think that is largely true. but a polarity of all voters now register independent, they are neither democrat or republican. 0ne independent, they are neither democrat or republican. one of the reasons why there has been very little attrition from the base is because most of this information is only to the people inside the beltway, their lawyers, the little group, that is why it is critical that if impeachment is to move forward there will be televised hearings like there was in water coat and if we hear from hearings like there was in water coat and if we hearfrom donald trump coat and if we hearfrom donald trumer, coat and if we hearfrom donald trump jr, paul manafort and coat and if we hearfrom donald trumer, paul manafort and michael cohen and mrtrump trumer, paul manafort and michael cohen and mr trump himself, to testify in a case of this magnitude. until there is televised hearings,
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the register will not move much on the register will not move much on the popularity front. it is fascinating to talk to you, thank you for your insight. we might discuss this again. much more coming up in the next half an hour. time for a look at the weather, with mel coles. cooler conditions are creeping south as we have gone through the day and that has reflected in the temperatures. mid—teens are best for the north half the coventry and in the north half the coventry and in the south we are just reaching the low 20s. this evening, the cooler theme continues as the air makes its way down from the north. it gradually squeezing out the humid air. for many areas it will be dry with clear skies but further showers
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feeding into northern ireland, nor plus scotland and they will filter down to paths of lancashire and cumbria overnight. temperatures in single figures. it will be fresh, particularly in rural spots but 12 celsius in the south—east will feel fresh. gusts of around 30 malls an hour and the showers rattling through from the north—west as we head through the day. spilling southwards and eastwards as the day goes on and those temperatures disappointing. highs in the high teens. this is bbc news. the headlines: the government sets out its advice for people and businesses on how to manage if the uk leaves the eu without a deal. the british—iranian woman nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is reunited with her daughter — after being granted three days temporary release from prison in iran.
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gcse pass rates in england, wales and northern ireland have risen slightly, despite an overhaul to make the exams more demanding. 12 people have been arrested and charged in connection with allegations of child abuse at a home run by an order of nuns in lanarkshire. we will talk more about brexit in relation to business and how it might deal with things once we are into 2019. now, let's get the sport with sarah mulkerrins. 31 yea rs 31 years after his first winner, markjohnston has saddled any other british winners than any other trainer. he has reached 4194 and he has done it ie europe. it was an outside when ridden by frankie dettori. won the handicap chase to give the 58—year—old scot the winner
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out right. he had been tied with richard hammond senior, who retired five years ago. he had nine runners yesterday without a win. his first was in 1987 and times have changed in the sport since then. my most abiding memory is coming home and watching teletext, just putting the results on teletext and having nothing else on the television all night. there was no racing channels in those days. i had huge ambitions to train lots and lots of good winners. but i don't know if i was thinking about 4194. england have recalled james vince for the fourth test against india. he was dropped after the tour of new zealand —— new zealand in april and will cover for jonny bairstow, who has broken finger. ifjonny bairstow is passed fit he will play as a specialist batsman with just just fit he will play as a specialist batsman with justjust be glad to
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keep wicket. it isn't just the number of runs vince has scored but the manner of which they have been. important, match—winning contribution is asked of him after he was dropped. whether he plays depends onjonny he was dropped. whether he plays depends on jonny bairstow‘s fitness. we know he cannot keep wicket because of his broken finger which also means batting and fielding could be seen as a risk and moeen ali could return if the selectors think the pitch will take spin. jennings retains his place and also that of alistair cooke, only averaging 24 with one, 50 this summer. averaging 24 with one, 50 this summer. three british clubs will be hoping to take a step to the europa league stages tonight, celtic are in action and burnley are in greece in the first leg of their play—off tie. they have come through two rounds and the manager says this will be the toughest yet. the prestige of any tournament is when you play against the big names. they have
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history here, and knowledge of different variances in the european scene of football and that this probably in their favour. tiger woods and phil mickelson will go head—to—head in a winner takes all $9 millionjewel on the head—to—head in a winner takes all $9 million jewel on the golf course in las vegas in november. they will meet at the shadow creek course in a matchplay event to be screened on pay—per—view. they have had an occasionally frosty relationship during their time at the top of the men's game and they will wear microphones so the audience can hear what they are saying to each other out on the course. sports meet entertainment. we will have more at 6:30pm. let's return to our top story — and the government has published the first set of documents giving people and businesses advice on how
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to manage if the uk leaves the european union without a deal. releasing documents relating to 25 areas of the economy, the brexit secretary, dominic raab, stressed that no—deal was "unlikely". meanwhile, the chancellor, philip hammond has written to the chair of the treasury committee, nicky morgan warning of "large fiscal consequences" in the event of a no—deal. with me here in the studio to discuss how a no—deal may affect business in the uk is the chairman of the consumer goods companyjml, john mills, who was also a major donor to the campaign to leave the eu. i am also joined by chris southworth, secretary general at the international chamber of commerce in the uk. welcome to both of you. the fact that the government has felt the need to produce these documents this morning and there are more to come of course, i will ask both of you,
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chris first of all, where is the balance between a government been very sensible, prudence and best have all bases covered, versus alarming people about the situation? it isa alarming people about the situation? it is a recognition of where we are. it is a recognition of where we are. it is a recognition of where we are. it is late given the eu has already published notifications. it is more clarity and that is what businesses are after. it is a recognition of less fa ntasy a nd are after. it is a recognition of less fantasy and crazy ideas and just reality, which is what businesses need to deal with in terms of planning. there is still a lack of advice the company is not based in the eu, but trading into the new. there is no advice for them. they are trading in an information vacuum and that should be addressed. john, your thoughts? it is welcome these reports are coming out. if there is any deal you are trying to do and you are not in are trying to do and you are not in a position where you can walk away if you get a bad deal, you will
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never get a reasonable outcome in the first place. i hope we do finish up the first place. i hope we do finish up having a reasonable deal with the eu, although it's not clear what it will be. but be prepared to walk away is the right thing to do, particularly as this might happen. you traded in all sorts of countries, is chris making a valid point when he says there's not a lot of advice for businesses, which is extraordinary with only seven months to go? on the paperwork side, with customs and things. it is difficult andl customs and things. it is difficult and i do appreciate firms who have never done this sort of thing, but most paperwork for international trade is, in the end, looks frightening but it is computer stuff which is churned out all the time, a lot of repetition and it isn't that difficult. what would your members say to that? john has been running a
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big company for a very long time, it's not rocket science, without wishing to put words in your mouth? we have been fighting for 100 years for no bureaucracy. the companies trade best when there is minimal bureaucracy and red tape. the minute you start asking companies to fill in forms, you start asking companies to fill informs, and you start asking companies to fill in forms, and small companies, there is nobody in the company to fill the four men, and for every country you trade into, there is a different set of rules and that is more complexity the company has to deal with. this is not just about the company has to deal with. this is notjust about companies trading a set of goods to a country, it's also about supply change. the free movement on—board is critical to the timing of deliveries. the food industry is so efficient, you'll only have to change it by two minutes and you add in an enormous amount of delays and costs. those costs go at the end of the day on two businesses or the consumers. they have got to go somewhere. when
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you talk about two minutes, but is an unbelievably tight window. it is not scaremongering to say that would have cost implication? there would be some cost implication. i find it ha rd be some cost implication. i find it hard to believe that two minutes one way or the other well supply change... chris says it is with perishables? they will not perish in two minutes. i think there is more flexibility in the system than that. quite a lot of components have come in for the quite a lot of components have come in forthe car quite a lot of components have come in for the car industry and they don't come from the european union at all, they come from japan and other places. nissan and companies like that manage perfectly well with the minimum amount of delays that are involved. it is easy to exaggerate how difficult these problems might be. is chris amonde exaggerate is, are you scaremongering? the overwhelming majority of our members think the other way and you would have to be brave just to dismiss the advice of
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business leaders worldwide, notjust here in the uk and europe, but worldwide. i don't know a single company in the last two years think this is a good idea and a hard brexit as all sorts of considerations, two people's livelihoods. if you add 3% of cost on to your business model, some companies have a fine margin and thatis companies have a fine margin and that is enough to make you go bust. we shouldn't be so blase about costs and the implications, even for the big guys like toyota or the car manufacturers, they are in an incredibly competitive environment and the minute you add on us like us, somebody has to pay for that. that is jobs and livelihoods, john mills? i am sure that trite but you have to be careful not to exaggerate what is going to happen. look back what is going to happen. look back what we were told would happen before the referendum. we were told the economy would go down by 4%,
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there would be thousands of people unemployed, with a told the economy would tank and it didn't happen. it is easy to exaggerate what these downsides might be. in the outcome of the brexit negotiations, i don't think it will make a huge difference to most as this is. border controls do have an impact? they have a small impact. my point is, they haven't come in yet because we're not in march 2019? i know how much it is to prepare the paperwork for a huge container and it is minimal. the exchange rate has gone down by 15% since brexit, so the idea this will make a make or break difference to most businesses, i believe it. very quick, final thought, chris?|j most businesses, i believe it. very quick, finalthought, chris? i don't
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think anybody is scaremongering, these are just facts. we now know a lot more than we did two years ago so lot more than we did two years ago so whatever the predictions, put it all aside and focus on practicalities. it does make a difference if you have an open border or a hard border, difference if you have an open border ora hard border, it difference if you have an open border or a hard border, it makes a big difference. you only go trading outside europe and you find what the difference is between seamless borders, paperless borders and non—paperless borders. it isn't as easy as that for everyone and it does impact some sectors more than others. food is one, aerospace is another way you have complex supply change and then you rely on free movement. a hard brexit at the end of the day means hard borders. thank you both very much. that's the view from the uk, but what about the rest of europe? german business leaders have urged the two sides in the brexit negotiations to strike a deal, and avoid a so called hard brexit. the german chamber of commerce has warned that time is running out and the uncertainty is already costing its companies time and money.
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jenny hill reports now from mosel, famous for its wine. in a region where it pays to be patient, they're getting tired of waiting. the wine has to be 100% produced... ernst sends his german wine all over the world. butjust as he cracked the british export market, the bitter taste of brexit... i asked last time my importer, you know, i mean, "what impact do you think this whole thing has, do we have to do anything?" and she said, "what should i know? we have no clue." we don't know, nobody gives a... i think that's the biggest problem. everybody‘s waiting for answers, you know? what german traders fear most — unpacking a no—deal brexit. at this family firm, they import medicine, much of it from britain. they also spend time, money, preparing for the worst. if it would come to a no—deal
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brexit, then we would lose the ability to source from great britain. and therefore we have to try to establish new supply lines in other countries. so, you might actually end up taking business away from britain? er, yes, that would be... well, it's not our decision. this country has built its economic success on a reputation for stability. no wonder, then, germany's family firms are so unsettled by not so much britain's decision to leave the eu, but by the uncertainty that decision has brought already to this, europe's biggest economy. the german business world worries. jobs, companies, depend on britain. even so, few here would change the country's political stance. we here in berlin, we have never understood, either in our talks in berlin, in brussels or in london, what could be a softer stance
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of chancellor merkel, what could be a softer stance of germany. because the integrity of the single market is our major goal, and we have to and we do want and we will preserve that. and no doubt about it. toasting, then, an uncertain future, whose complexity germany fears may not be to the taste of even those who chose it. jenny hill, bbc news, the mosul valley. the headlines on bbc news... the government sets out its advice for people and businesses on how to manage if the uk leaves the eu without a deal. the british—iranian woman nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is granted three days temporary release from prison in iran. a slight rise in the overall pass rate, as pupils across england, wales and northern ireland get their gcse results. an update on the market
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numbers for you... latest figures show that fewer people are coming to live and work in the uk from other european union countries. net migration from the eu — the difference between those arriving and leaving, has fallen to its lowest level for more than five years. according to figures from the office for national statistics, in the 12 months to the end of march, 87,000 more people arrived in britain from eu countries than emigrated. the overall net migration figure for the period was 271,000. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has called for radical reform of the media, saying the news industry is failing the public. speaking at the edinburgh tv festival, mr corbyn threatened digital companies with a windfall
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tax, unless they agree to help fund public interest journalism — a measure the conservatives say would lead to higher bills 0ne one solution to funding public interest media could be by tapping up interest media could be by tapping up the digital monopolies that profit from every search, every share and every like that we make on our computers or smartphones. a strong, self—confident government could negotiate with these tech giants to create a fund run entirely independently, support public interest media. four men have been jailed for trying to smuggle a haul of cocaine worth more than £40 million into the uk. they were were stopped at farnborough airport in hampshire with half a tonne of the drug in 15 suitcases after flying in a private jet from the colombian capital, bogota. tom symonds has the details.
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it was like a scene from a crime drama. the sleek, private jet paid for with £130,000 in cash arriving at farnborough airport. 15 heavy suitcases unloaded. the gang, whisked off in their hired cars. but they didn't get far. customs officers pulled them overfor a search. one of the gang watching. and inside the first case was a serious amount of cocaine. we've been asked not to show the face of the customs officer, but he has a big smile. presumably they don't get many days like that? well, this is one of the largest seizures in our region's history. but it is a day that we want to celebrate and showed that this sort of activity, people that are seeking to smuggle illicit goods into the country, our officers are there to identify them and take action.
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15 suitcases, half a tonne of cocaine worth £41 million on the street. the logos are linked to a colombian drugs cartel. this was the smugglers' second flight to bogota. they had a corrupt official working in a ground handling company there. the national crime agency worked back to cctv, tracking their movements. here, they are setting the combination locks on their suitcases. these earlier baggage scans are thought to show the millions in cash they flew out with to pay for the drugs. both times they arrived back at farmborough, possibly chosen because it's small. two years ago, the border force customs operation at this airport was criticised by the independent inspector. he said that staff were carrying out too few baggage checks. they were concentrating instead on immigration. the national crime agency says that small airports like this are vulnerable to smuggling. you're never going to really win with that.
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a utopia scenario is having all those airports or strips for landing aircraft manned by resource. that's not going to happen. so it's around being clever, it's around systems, it's around bringing people and experts together that can actually look at information and work out who they are going to stop. the border force says it is now doing more checks at farmborough. we've taken that report incredibly seriously and have upped our efforts in that environment and the success we are talking about here today is exactly as a result of that. the four men posed as rich businessmen, heading to bogota for a concert by the singer, bruno mars. they've been jailed for between 20 and 24 years. tom symonds, bbc news, farmborough. this weekend, the belgian grand prix is held at spa, a track synonymous with the success of seven—time world champion michael schumacher. he dominated formula 0ne during the 1990s but suffered a serious brain injury in a skiing accident nearly five years ago. now, his 19 year—old son mick has aspirations
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to follow his father into motor racing. 0ur formula one correspondent jennie gow, went to meet him at home in switzerland. his father is a sporting icon and the most successful formula one driver of all time. having started out with a go—kart in the garden when he was just three years old, mick schumacher is carving out his own career in motorsport. recently taking his first win in european formula 3. i always did different sports but there was never this feeling that i wanted to do that in the future. there was always a feeling that i wanted to do that, racing, kind of thing. speeding and being quick and racing and fighting against each other. at the end, i try to be the best. mick's first f3 win came at spa, the very same circuit that his father michael got his maiden grand prix victory back in 1992. the first win ever for michael schumacher...
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in a career that spanned two decades, schumacher remains the only racer to have ever won five consecutive titles. he had retired from motorsport when he sustained a life—threatening injury whilst skiing in france. but in mick, the family's talent and passion for motor racing continues. i want to ask about the role that your dad has had on your career. he had a huge influence. as everybody knows, i guess he's my idol. he is the person i looked up to and i am really following everything he did and trying to look at something that i could use myself. and so he had a huge role in how i am driving now. really happy about that. in his early career, mick raced under his mother's maiden name to avoid the spotlight. but now the steely determination associated with the schumacher family shines through.
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your name is now synonymous with motorsport, isn't it? yes, it is. but i don't know if... for sure, a lot of doors open easier and i want to prove that i am a racing driver and not only someone who has the name. i don't have any rush so for me if i am ready as a racing driver, a complete racing driver, i think that is the right moment for me to go into f1 and then that is when i am able to show what i have got. at the belgian grand prix last season, mick drove his father's car around the track, a tribute to past successes and a glimpse at the potential that lies ahead. jenny gow, bbc news. i'll be back at five tomorrow with the film review with mark kermode. but now it's time for a look at the weather, with mel coles.
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the cooler conditions are beginning to creep southwards. while there have been dry, bright and even sunny spells, we have had further outbreaks of rain as we have gone through the afternoon followed by showers to northern ireland and on to scotland. as we go to the evening, let's show you the radar. the two weather fronts quite nicely. the two weather fronts quite nicely. the first one is going to the east and the second one will be in northern england. the coolness reflected in those temperatures. we're looking at mid—teens for the northern half of the country and the further south will just about reached 20 celsius. the cooler air continues to make inroads as we head into the overnight period. coming from a northerly direction, it is a fresh direction to be coming from squeezing away the humidity. that
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the showers the northern ireland and the showers the northern ireland and the north—west overnight which will filter into part of cumbria and lancashire overnight. elsewhere it isa dry lancashire overnight. elsewhere it is a dry story with clear skies so it will be fresher, particularly in the rural spots. widely in single figures but even 12 celsius down towards the south and the east will feel fresher. through friday, you will notice the strength of the wind, gusts of 30 miles an hour, particularly around the showers and they do get going, packing into northern ireland, northern scotland and some of them could be heavy and thundery. they will rattle through quite quickly but they will be more widespread. temperatures mid to high teens across the board. 0n widespread. temperatures mid to high teens across the board. on saturday we have a keen, northerly wind affecting the eastern coast but a ridge of high pressure will kill off any of the showers. just a chance of 12 here and there and then sheltered spots in the sunshine it should feel pleasant. but still on the fresh
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side and mac continues into sunday. the next weather system waiting in the wings to bring more outbreaks of rain which will edge in from the west. there is some uncertainty about the timing of this rain but it looks as though it will push into the isles of scilly, the south—west, into wales, northern ireland and scotla nd into wales, northern ireland and scotland and gradually working eastwards as we head through the day. ahead of that the cloud will steadily increase and under the cloud and with the rain it will feel cool cloud and with the rain it will feel cool. temperatures in the mid to high teens at best. the cooler theme continues into monday. for some, a bank holiday. the uk can handle a no—deal brexit. that's the message from the government as it offers advice, on how to cope. a raft of documents have been released, covering everything from credit cards, to pensions, medicines and trade. it's not what we want, and it's not what we expect.
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but we must be ready. we have a duty as a responsible government to plan for every eventuality. i thought the proposals were bland, thin on detail, thin on substance, and i don't think they are going to reassure anybody. with barely seven months to go before brexit, we'll be assessing what a no deal might mean for you. also on the programme... reunited with her daughter, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, jailed in iran and accused of spying, has been temporarily released. we've had so many dashed hopes and false dawns, and i had
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